Academy Strength Training, Part 2

Q: I saw one of your articles on Bodybuilding.com. I am also a police officer. My department currently has an opening for Wellness Coordinator. I hope to fill the position.

I would like to bring something new to our department. Right now, I feel the physical training is below par. I am looking for ways to best train recruits. I have researched a lot of programs online, but I feel the same way you do, that the past and present training regimens are not beneficial to new officers.

Can you recommend any books and/or websites? Your help is much appreciated.



My Answer: Books... books... oh, I don't know... MY books might be good.

Seriously though, my books are good for recreational bodybuilders: guys just looking to get bigger, stronger and ripped. So the info in these books is not geared specifically for law enforcement, but more for men in general.


Now when you conduct the strength training of academy classes, you're always going to be limited by the equipment and the number of students. Strength training is not like cardio. It doesn't lend itself well to group training. It is primarily a solitary or partner activity. Plus it's hard to train a group if you have limited equipment, and the equipment is being used one recruit officer at a time.

So you have to think of ways to train your students with minimal to no equipment. I've answered this question before: Academy PT Programming.

What I would add to my previous answer is that you should include some grip training and ab work. For grip training, you can pair up your students according to their individual strength levels and have them do arm wrestling.

For ab work, I would suggest having them line up at the pull-up bars and do hanging leg raises. You could also train the entire class with difficult versions of the plank.  Each recruit officer can perform a variation of the plank that suits his or her abilities.

Good luck!
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